Interview on “The Open Mic,” plus new testimonials

Everyone who has a blog has the intention to update it regularly, and I’m no different–but life and client projects keep me busy. Nevertheless, I have news to share.

Journalist and editor of the book In Their Own Words: Twenty Successful Writers on the Craft and Business of Writing interviewed me for his blog The Open Mic. We had a fun conversation about developmental editing for nonfiction books. I had the opportunity to answer one of my favorite questions–what writing problems do I see most often when editing books and other content from subject matter experts? You view the interview here.

I’m also happy to share some new testimonials from clients, which you can find sprinkled throughout this site. The latest is from a memoirist who received a manuscript critique from me in November 2018:

Read moreInterview on “The Open Mic,” plus new testimonials

Editorial Updates: Spring Cleaning, 2017

I hate to see professional websites with stale, un-updated blogs. . . and yet I seem to have one. No longer! Spring cleaning means I need to address this shameful situation.

Here are some projects I’ve been up to in the past year:

Contract content writing. I write SEO-optimized medical blog posts for an agency with multiple clients (1-6 posts per week). I also ghost write weekly corporate blog posts for a second client in a B2B industry. I can do this for more clients–contact me if you need content.

Nonfiction book editing. Note, you may see “non-fiction” and “nonfiction” spelled interchangeably throughout this site. I let the inconsistency stand so I can grab both search terms, though I prefer the non-hyphenated version.

Over the course of the last year, I’ve been editing a business book one chapter at a time–providing a mix of content editing and light line editing. That book will be published by a major business and technology book publisher sometime later this year or in early 2018. If you’re interested in working with a developmental editor, contact me–tell me about your project (book or otherwise), how far along you are with your work, your timeline, and what you think you may need.

Nonfiction manuscript critique. Last month I completed a manuscript critique of a self-published business book on leadership and management. How critique works: I read a finished draft of a book, then provide a 2-5 page, single-spaced editorial letter outlining any major issues I see (e.g., persistent grammar or usage problems; voice or style inconsistency; confusing train of thought; sequencing or structural problems; and areas where the author needs to expand upon an idea in order to make the book more “book-like” or marketable). Critique is a service I will soon list prominently in my offerings–it’s great fun to work with authors at this level, and it’s an easy, productive way for both parties to get to know each other without entering into a long-term contract. If you’re interested in critique, contact me–tell me about your project, your timeline, and where you feel your writing needs the most attention.

Upcoming Projects:

Over the next few weeks, I’m starting two new, small projects: editing and revising marketing copy for two publishing-related clients. 

How I Can Help You:

If you have a nonfiction manuscript in need of a critique or content edit, I have room in my schedule beginning June 1. I’m also taking ghostwriting and book doctoring work (nonfiction only). 

  • Critique = two read-throughs, an editorial letter, and occasional margin notes.
  • Content edit = a thorough markup of your digital manuscript with margin notes regarding structure, tone, voice, argument/research (how well did you build your case?), and sequencing of ideas. This level of editing includes light line editing (to show examples of how to fix persistent grammar or usage issues). 
  • Book doctoring = revising or helping to complete (i.e., add material to) a nearly finished nonfiction book. 
  • Ghostwriting = heavy re-writing or writing from scratch: nonfiction books, presentation materials, blog posts, business letters, query letters, etc.

Spring is an ideal time to get an editor or collaborative writer on your side–especially if you want to work faster so you can enjoy your well-earned summer vacation. Let’s chat!